How culture influences the way we shop, how we view brands and our attitude to consumerism.


FEATURING EXPERT INSIGHT
‘Developing user journeys for an impatient world’ – Kevin Davis, The Designlab
‘How not to offend Chinese customers’ – James Campbell, Tong Digital
‘What millennials and gen-z want from brands and employers’ – Adrian Ramani, Shift




DEVELOPING USER JOURNEYS FOR AN IMPATIENT WORLD
No matter the stage of the shopping journey, from finding the product they’re looking for to getting their goods, today’s demanding customer wants it right now.

With so much choice the modern consumer is nowhere near as forgiving as those of yesteryear. One poor experience can push them elsewhere. And it isn’t only competitors brands need to worry about – the impatient customer has a host of distractions, not least social media, which can take their attention away from a purchasing journey.

Kevin Davis, creative director at The Designlab demonstrated how brands can keep consumers engaged from discovery to purchase.



HOW NOT TO OFFEND CHINESE CUSTOMERS
China’s growing middle class represents a huge opportunity for luxury brands, but marketing to these consumers can go wrong for brands without an understanding of Chinese culture.

Dolce & Gabbana faced the wrath of Chinese consumers on social media, forcing local partners to cut ties with the brand, while companies as diverse as Mercedes-Benz, Gap and Versace have also caused offence in the region.

James Campbell, co-founder at Chinese social commerce agency Tong Digital, has worked on projects to help brands such as Huda Beauty, Chelsea Football Club, Boden and Anya Hindmarch to raise their profiles in China.

James provided tips to help understand how to market to the Chinese without causing offence, looking at how the momentum against the aforementioned brands began and tactics to recover if things do go wrong.



WHAT MILLENNIALS AND GEN Z EXPECT FROM BRANDS AND EMPLOYERS
The old retailing convention of ‘the right product at the right price and the right time’ is losing its credence. Younger generations want to buy into values. They judge a brand on its approach to sustainability, diversity and the well-being of its employees; amongst many other new societal standards.

Many brands are responding by adapting behind-the-scenes, and in marketing, to attract the next generation of talent and customers. From creating an environment that favours their attitude to work, to associating themselves with the right social and cultural causes, brands see being relevant to the millennial and generation-z cohort as a must for survival.

Adrian Ramani, founder of Shift recruitment, has advised hundreds of retailers and brands, helping them to find managers and directors to run their e-commerce and marketing teams. His presentation uncovered how a company’s culture goes on to impact the bottom line, with insight on what millennials and generation z expect from employers and brands.